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The Past Is Not Dead
Essays from the Southern Quarterly

Edited by Douglas B. Chambers
With Kenneth Watson

Foreword by Peggy Whitman Prenshaw

352 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, foreword, introduction, index

978-1-61703-303-2 Printed casebinding $65.00S

978-1-61703-304-9 Paper $30.00S

978-1-61703-305-6 Ebook $30.00

Printed casebinding, $65.00

Paper, $30.00

Ebook 978-1-61703-305-6, $30.00

The very best essays from fifty years of scholarship and thought

Essays by Margaret Walker Alexander, Alfred Bendixen, David C. Berry, Augustus M. Burns, James Taylor Carson, Thadious M. Davis, Susan V. Donaldson, Don H. Doyle, Barbara C. Ewell, Robert L. Hall, William H. Hatcher, Arthell Kelley, Manning Marable, Joseph Millichap, Willie Morris, John Solomon Otto, Harriet Pollack, Kathryn L. Seidel, John Ray Skates, Randy J. Sparks, Martha Swain, and Anne Bradford Warner

The Past Is Not Dead is a collection of twenty literary and historical essays that will mark the fiftieth anniversary of the Southern Quarterly, one of the oldest scholarly journals (founded in 1962) dedicated to southern studies. Like its companion volume Personal Souths, this essay collection features the best work published in the journal. Essays represent every decade of the journal's history, from the 1960s to the 2000s. Topics range from historical essays on the Mississippi frontier, southern religion, African culinary influences, and New Deal politics, to literary essays on George W. Cable, James Dickey, William Faulkner, Eudora Welty, and Richard Wright. Important regional subjects like the Yazoo Basin and Mississippi blues are given special attention. Contributors range from such noted literary figures as Margaret Walker Alexander and Willie Morris, to literary critics Thadious M. Davis, Susan V. Donaldson, Kathryn L. Seidel, and Joseph Millichap, to scholars of African American studies such as Robert L. Hall and Manning Marable and historians including Don H. Doyle, Randy J. Sparks, and Martha Swain.

Collectively, the essays in The Past Is Not Dead enrich and illuminate our understanding of southern history, literature, and culture, and celebrate the work of a distinctive, distinguished journal.

Douglas B. Chambers, Brooklyn, Mississippi, is the former editor of the Southern Quarterly (2005-2011) and associate professor of history at the University of Southern Mississippi. He is the author of Murder at Montpelier: Igbo Africans in Virginia, published by University Press of Mississippi. Kenneth Watson, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, is the former associate editor of Southern Quarterly (2005-2011) and associate professor of English at the University of Southern Mississippi. Peggy Whitman Prenshaw, Jackson, Mississippi, is a former editor of the Southern Quarterly (1974-1991), Millsaps College humanities scholar-in-residence, and Fred C. Frey Professor Emerita, Louisiana State University, and is the series editor of the Literary Conversations Series.

352 pages (approx.), 6 x 9 inches, foreword, introduction, index